Candle Holders 18.28 cm

This unique pair of candle holders are large enough to be functional with normal sized candles and give light to a fairly large table. Two men stand erect on a trapezoidal shaped platform with archaic script incised on the sides. They have large, widely out-stretched arms, holding in each hand the bottom of long, detachable tri-branched poles, which penetrate and support also detachable round concave plates upon which candles are placed. The men are dressed with long, full-sleeved, thigh length tunics with collars incised with lozenge patterns. The tunics are tied at the waist with a very large rope shaped ‘belt’, below which the skirt of the tunic is decorated with S-shaped spirals connecting scroll shaped ones. The headress consist of a flat, round brim with a top piece that slopes backward with the shape similar to a breaking wave; this may be a hair bun that penetrates and is held by the circular brim. The legs are disproportionately short and small compared to the arms, and the feet are shoeless, with toes indicated by incised lines. The hands are stylistically oversized in order to hold the candle holder poles and they are interestingly cubist in shape with fingers also incised. The face is long rather than round or oval, and the cheekbones are not prominent. The bridge of the nose is long, carved in relief, with a moderately wide, ru-i shape at the terminus. The deeply incised eyes are oval shaped. The mustache is the most prominent facial feature, being full, masculine, and pointed at each end, not unlike some of Qin Shi Huangdi’s terra cotta warriors. Beneath the mustache the lower lip protrudes full and pouting in the manner of a ‘camel’ or Semitic lip often represented by the Chinese on figurines of western merchants and envoys.

Suggested Attribution:

Size: 18.28 cm

This unique pair of candle holders are large enough to be functional with normal sized candles and give light to a fairly large table. Two men stand erect on a trapezoidal shaped platform with archaic script incised on the sides. They have large, widely out-stretched arms, holding in each hand the bottom of long, detachable tri-branched poles, which penetrate and support also detachable round concave plates upon which candles are placed. The men are dressed with long, full-sleeved, thigh length tunics with collars incised with lozenge patterns. The tunics are tied at the waist with a very large rope shaped ‘belt’, below which the skirt of the tunic is decorated with S-shaped spirals connecting scroll shaped ones. The headress consist of a flat, round brim with a top piece that slopes backward with the shape similar to a breaking wave; this may be a hair bun that penetrates and is held by the circular brim. The legs are disproportionately short and small compared to the arms, and the feet are shoeless, with toes indicated by incised lines. The hands are stylistically oversized in order to hold the candle holder poles and they are interestingly cubist in shape with fingers also incised. The face is long rather than round or oval, and the cheekbones are not prominent. The bridge of the nose is long, carved in relief, with a moderately wide, ru-i shape at the terminus. The deeply incised eyes are oval shaped. The mustache is the most prominent facial feature, being full, masculine, and pointed at each end, not unlike some of Qin Shi Huangdi’s terra cotta warriors. Beneath the mustache the lower lip protrudes full and pouting in the manner of a ‘camel’ or Semitic lip often represented by the Chinese on figurines of western merchants and envoys.